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Old June 13th, 2006, 07:47 PM   #21
myrrh78
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True rose water is referring to distilled rose water which should need no preservatives. Another word for this is "hydrosol."

How this is made is from boiling rose petals in water and catching the steam. This isn't as difficult as it sounds, Victorian housekeepers did this every year. You set an empty heatproof bowl on top of a platform in the pot (also heatproof) and you invert the lid, so that as the steam collects it drips into the empty bowl. Continue with the rose petals and clean water until you have the desired amount collected. Cap in a sterilized bottle, it should need no special preservation other than cool storage.

For the maximum scent collect the blossoms as soon as they open, and put them in the water asap. This works best of course if you have lots of rose bushes. Also--the best roses for this are rugosa roses. The less altered the roses the better. Meaning generally the fewer "petals." Please ask me if this is confusing. I am an herbalist and botany enthusiast.

Distilled rosewater is not expensive in the US if you go to a Middle Eastern or Indian store. It should be under $3.

HTH
~Myrrh
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Old June 13th, 2006, 07:52 PM   #22
jessie58
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Quote:
Originally Posted by myrrh78
True rose water is referring to distilled rose water which should need no preservatives. Another word for this is "hydrosol."

How this is made is from boiling rose petals in water and catching the steam. This isn't as difficult as it sounds, Victorian housekeepers did this every year. You set an empty heatproof bowl on top of a platform in the pot (also heatproof) and you invert the lid, so that as the steam collects it drips into the empty bowl. Continue with the rose petals and clean water until you have the desired amount collected. Cap in a sterilized bottle, it should need no special preservation other than cool storage.

For the maximum scent collect the blossoms as soon as they open, and put them in the water asap. This works best of course if you have lots of rose bushes. Also--the best roses for this are rugosa roses. The less altered the roses the better. Meaning generally the fewer "petals." Please ask me if this is confusing. I am an herbalist and botany enthusiast.

Distilled rosewater is not expensive in the US if you go to a Middle Eastern or Indian store. It should be under $3.

HTH
~Myrrh

Yes, this method was posted in a link above. It seems like a much more efficient way than the way I did it. I definitely would try this for my next batch.
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Old June 14th, 2006, 08:16 AM   #23
myrrh78
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That's great.

I hadn't checked the link yet. The funny thing is I even have that little booklet by Rosemary Gladstar, but that isn't where I learned how to make rosewater . I learned in my herbalism apprenticeship. It's also in Discovering Wild Plants by Janice Schofield, a great book for people in the Pacific Northwest or Western Alaska. Roses are abundant and wild here, especially near the coast.

Rosemary Gladstar is so cool. On a hair note -in that booklet she goes over how to henna your hair, she calls it "henna lights."
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Old June 14th, 2006, 10:49 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by myrrh78
Distilled rosewater is not expensive in the US if you go to a Middle Eastern or Indian store. It should be under $3.

HTH
~Myrrh

Thats the type I have... and I am very pleased with it.

I also use it as a toner.
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Old June 14th, 2006, 05:10 PM   #25
Hedera
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You might want to be careful though: most roses are grown using a lot of pesticides, anti-fungals and other nasties...

Don't want to put any of that on your face!
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Old June 14th, 2006, 05:19 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hedera
You might want to be careful though: most roses are grown using a lot of pesticides, anti-fungals and other nasties...

Don't want to put any of that on your face!

Oooh scary, maybe I'll be growing a third eye soon. LOL
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Old June 14th, 2006, 05:34 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by jessie58
Oooh scary, maybe I'll be growing a third eye soon. LOL

Well, at least you wouldn't get any fungusses (fungi? fungee? fungooses? fungz?) growing on your face.

The stuff that's used for cosmetics or food preparation is grown for the purpose, with less/different pesticides. The roses you'd buy at a flower shop have been grown for maximum production, durability (to survive at least a few days after they've been picked, to make their way to the flower shop and your home) etc. Roses are extremely prone to all kinds of diseases, so a lot of poisons are used then.
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Old June 14th, 2006, 05:39 PM   #28
jessie58
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hedera
Well, at least you wouldn't get any fungusses (fungi? fungee? fungooses? fungz?) growing on your face.

The stuff that's used for cosmetics or food preparation is grown for the purpose, with less/different pesticides. The roses you'd buy at a flower shop have been grown for maximum production, durability (to survive at least a few days after they've been picked, to make their way to the flower shop and your home) etc. Roses are extremely prone to all kinds of diseases, so a lot of poisons are used then.

This is true. Maybe I should snitch some out of my neighbor's garden, she's a natural gardener, she has a lot of trouble with her roses though and strangely enough, I had a rose bush for about 5 years and it grew like a weed and I never once put anything on it and my neighbors all couldn't believe it, because theirs would always succumb to various ailments and bugs. I made the stupid mistake of trying to move my rosebush and of course I killed it off and I haven't got another one since. I'm trying to remember the name of it, but it had star shaped pink roses.
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