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Old July 4th, 2006, 07:48 AM   #31
summer-time
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Quote:
Originally Posted by April00
Hi Dulci...
I network with a group of excellent ladies (and men) who are all nail techs from around the world. We really take this stuff seriously, as lame as that may sound, but we are a competitive bunch who are out to prove ourselves, focus on our skills, and educate not only ourselves, but our clients as well.

One of the things that really gets under our skin is the discount salons that seem to be on every street corner and every walmart. They use filthy implements and files to work on your nails, often apply acrylics incorrectly, overfiling the nails, and misuse electric files. They use products that are harmful to their clients with no regard of the effects it could possibly have on them. I have had many customers come to me that have been such places with horrible damage to their nails. The sad part is, the customers are led to believe that this is "normal" and is just part of having acrylics done. It really gives the nail industry a bad name.

One of our networking groups' major goals is to focus on what's best for our customers and give them the beautiful nails they want, not to think of how much money we can make by ripping people off.

If you are really interested in more, contact me at nailnut88@aol.com. I'll be happy to help you find a reputible tech in your area.





I know your talking about acrylics but do you know about fiberglass nails.
I used to get those, and I'd be interested in any information you may have about them and what to look for with a skilled nail tech.
Thanks
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Old July 4th, 2006, 06:07 PM   #32
April00
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I think you might be referring to what we were taught in school as "wraps". Is the fiberglass you're speaking of a peice of actual "fabric" that is put over your entire nail? In school we did fiberglass wraps, silk wraps and linen wraps - all were done with the fabric mentioned and a glue system. They're nice if done right. Not too many techs do them though. As far as finding a reputible tech, if you give me your area I can check around for you.
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Old July 4th, 2006, 06:36 PM   #33
summer-time
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Quote:
Originally Posted by April00
I think you might be referring to what we were taught in school as "wraps". Is the fiberglass you're speaking of a peice of actual "fabric" that is put over your entire nail? In school we did fiberglass wraps, silk wraps and linen wraps - all were done with the fabric mentioned and a glue system. They're nice if done right. Not too many techs do them though. As far as finding a reputible tech, if you give me your area I can check around for you.


She did use what appeared to be a fabric "netting" if that makes sense, and a nail tip, it didn't go all the way down the nail bed- half way. Then she's cut the tip down, shape it and brush on a clear liquid glue. Then she'd do a top coat, two coats of color, then a quick dry top coat.

I have never had gel, or acrylic nails- I need something really strong and they told me fiberglass nails were the strongest- is that true? If not which type is the strongest ?

I live in Gillette, Wyoming , when I had the fiberglass nails I was living in Casper Wyoming.


What concernes me is, I was talking to a lady who I noticed had her nails done, the bottom of one nail was lifting or coming up nearest the cuticle.
I didn't say anything but they are not supposed to do that-correct?

That said, I don't know how skilled the nail techs are in my area.
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Last edited by summer-time : July 4th, 2006 at 06:44 PM.
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Old July 4th, 2006, 09:31 PM   #34
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Yeah from what you described, it sounded like she did a fiberglass wrap on you. I wouldn't say they are the strongest of enhancements, no. They can be quite flimsy and as you saw, the bottom can start to lift away from the cuticle. Fiberglass gels are attached to the nail with a resin (glue) and we all know that over time, glue will break down in water, causing the material to lift from the nail. Also, if your tech is not careful and gets glue on your skin while doing this service, this can also make the fiberglass lift from the nail bed.
Fiberglass wraps are nice if you are trying to add a little strength to your natural nail, but they aren't really recommended for long term wear or known for their durability. They require maintenance as well - a fill is needed about every 2 weeks to cover the gap where the nail has grown at the cuticle area.

I think acrylic nails are the most durable, followed by gels, and then wraps.
In the nail world, not too many people really do wraps anymore.

I did a search and didn't find a tech in WY for you yet, but Ill keep looking.
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Old July 5th, 2006, 06:40 AM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by April00
Yeah from what you described, it sounded like she did a fiberglass wrap on you. I wouldn't say they are the strongest of enhancements, no. They can be quite flimsy and as you saw, the bottom can start to lift away from the cuticle. Fiberglass gels are attached to the nail with a resin (glue) and we all know that over time, glue will break down in water, causing the material to lift from the nail. Also, if your tech is not careful and gets glue on your skin while doing this service, this can also make the fiberglass lift from the nail bed.
Fiberglass wraps are nice if you are trying to add a little strength to your natural nail, but they aren't really recommended for long term wear or known for their durability. They require maintenance as well - a fill is needed about every 2 weeks to cover the gap where the nail has grown at the cuticle area.

I think acrylic nails are the most durable, followed by gels, and then wraps.
In the nail world, not too many people really do wraps anymore.

I did a search and didn't find a tech in WY for you yet, but Ill keep looking.






Ok I'm sorry, I guess I wasn't clear. When I lived in Casper, Wyoming I had my nails done with fiberglass, I never had a problem with them, and I really liked them.


Now I live in Gillette,Wyoming I have not had my nails done here. I was talking to a woman here in this town about two weeks ago, she had her nails done, one of her nails was uplifting at the cuticle. I didn't ask her where she had her nails done, but now I'm concerned about finding a skilled nail tech.
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Old July 5th, 2006, 07:50 AM   #36
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OH Ok. I gotcha now. Lifting should never be so prominent where you would notice it from just looking at her nails. If it is, then that's a really bad nail job! The acrylic was probably applied way too thick at the cuticle area and too close to the skin, which would cause lifting. Might have been a good idea to ask her where she got them done just so you'd know NOT to go there.

Here are some tips from my website:

For Clients: How to Choose a Quality Nail Salon

1. Are the salon and individual workstations clean? Does your nail technician observe proper sanitation practices?
Before the nail technician begins your service, you should both wash your hands. The towel at the table should be clean, and all the instruments to be used in the service should have been disinfected. Don't be afraid to ask your nail technician how the instruments have been disinfected. (They should be using a hospital grade disinfectant). If the files, drill bits, buffer blocks, or any implement they use on you looks dirty, tell them you've changed your mind and walk away. It is against state regulation to use dirty implements on anyone. It's also pretty disgusting!

2. What is included in the price of the service?
Many salons provide all-inclusive service prices; some salons charge a-la-carte. Be sure you understand exactly what services are performed for the price. For example, is polish extra? Is top coat or fast dry extra? Will you be charged for broken nails?

3. Did the nail technician explain the service to you, ask you questions about your needs, and inform you of proper home care?
There have been so many advancements in artificial nail products that nail technicians can make the most natural-looking nails in the world, but artificial nails aren't for everyone. Your nail technician should ask you about your needs and explain the at-home maintenance you should do to care for your nails. You should also share pertinent medical information with her (certain medications, for example, can hinder the application of certain nail products).

4. Does the salon have a strong odor?
There is an odor associated with some artifical nail products, bu there is no danger to customers smelling it during their service. However, an overpowering odor can be an indication of an inadequate ventilation system in the salon. Ask your nail technician or the salon owner what is done in the salon to minimize exposure to odors, vapors, and filing dust for customer comfort.

5. Does the technician use a drill or electric file?
Drills (or electric files) are commonly used in the nail industry, and, when used properly, are perfectly safe. You should not feel any pain or burning when the drill is being used; if you experience any discomfort, tell your nail technician immediately. The only time a drill should be used on the natural nail is with a buffer (no grit).

6. Is the nail technician and the salon licensed?
All states except Alaska, Connecticut, Nebraska and Utah require licenses for nail technicians, and most states require that the license be displayed for customers to see.

7. What products are used in the salon?
Most salons use products that are for professionals only, and your nail technican should be able to explain what products she uses and why. There have been great advances in nail chemistry in the last 10 years, but some salons still use chemicals whose use in nail care is not recommended, specifically, a product called methyl methacrylate (MMA).

8. What if you have a problem with your nails?
Good communication between nail professional and customer is essential, so if you are not happy with your service or your nails, talk to your nail technician or the salon owner about it. Your nail technician should be able to easily answer any concerns you may have.



Ok, now here's some info from my friend's website that should be considered as well:


Nail technicians across the country and around the world have been commenting that some salons are "duping" their clients by stating they are receiving a special service and charging more money when in reality they are getting a very common normal service with a fancy name at an inflated price. You need to understand the basic types of fingernail enhancement services and their differences to know what you are paying for:


1. Acrylic is a liquid & powder mixed applied with a brush that will harden (cure) with no lamps in 2 minutes or less.
2. Gel is a pre mixed acrylic in a gel like state that almost always needs to be cured under a UV lamp. Acrylic usually has an odor while gels are odorless. Gels often will cost slightly more than acrylic.
3. Silk (interchangeable with fiberglass and sometimes linen) is applied with resin (glue) and sometimes glue & acrylic powder (Dip System).
4. Acrylic Dips is the use of resin applied to the nail, then dipped or sprinkled with acrylic powder.
5. Crystal nails is any type of enhancement done with CLEAR acrylic, gel or resin either with clear tips or sculpted.

Examples of typical scams include:
* SOLAR NAILS - Solar Nails is a Brand Name Acrylic product. It is manufactured by Creative Nail Design. It is a true acrylic and nothing more.
* GEL NAILS - are exactly what it says, Gel. There is No liquid and powder mixture at all in the process of the application.
* CRYSTAL NAILS - simply a clear tip with clear acrylic overlayed on the entire enhancement.
* PORCELAIN NAILS - are the name that acrylic nails originally had.
* DIAMOND NAILS - this is a dipping system from the brand Dimond Nails.
* BAIT & SWITCH - salons will have three jars on the table, possibly hand labeled. One says acrylic, one says gel, and one says fiberglass. They are all acrylic, but the consumer will be told fiberglass and gel are better for their nails and cost more
* NONE of the above services are anything special, nor should they incur any additional cost.

There are 2 types of acrylic liquid monomer used in our industry:
1. EMA - Ethyl Methacrylate
2. MMA - Methyl Methacrylate
- The FDA, as far back as early 1970's, has stated, and still states, that MMA is a poisonous and deleterious substance and should not be used in liquid acrylic monomer for nail products.
- MMA is a very hard substance when cured (dry). Removal and maintenance of a MMA enhancement usually involves the use of a drill (electric file or e-file). E-files, when used by a technician who has been fully trained, are not dangerous or harmful to the natural nail plate. However, many who use this tool are untrained and have been known to cause pain and excessive damage to the nail plate by drilling into the nail plate, sometimes THROUGH the nail plate into the nail bed (sometimes this causes permanent damage).
- When a nail enhancement of MMA is banged or knocked, it has little to no flexibility and will break severely, often taking the nail plate with it. EMA is formulated to be flexible, the enhancement will break or crack, sometimes the nail will break off, but will not usually damage the nail plate.
- MMA does not soak off easily or in a reasonable length of time, causing undue exposure to acetone while soaking. Most Non-Standard Salons (NSS) will simply RIP the nails off or pry them off causing extreme damage to the natural nail plate. EMA should take about 20 minutes or less to soak off, while MMA will take two or more hours to remove by soaking in acetone.
- To make MMA adhere well to the nail, overly rough preparation methods are used. The nail plate is "roughed up" with a coarse file or an electric file, creating in effect, a shag carpet look to the nail plate, giving the MMA something to adhere to. This process thins and weakens the nail plate allowing more chemicals to be absorbed through the weakened nail plate during application and curing time. All acrylic enhancements, while hard enough to file in 1-4 minutes, continue to cure for as long as 36-48 hours after application.

Warning signs of MMA use:
1. MMA has an unusually strong or strange odor which doesn't smell like other acrylic liquids. Odor is present during application and when filing cured product (for fill or repairs).
2. Enhancements which are extremely hard and very difficult to file even with coarse abrasives.
3. Enhancements that will not soak off in solvents designed to remove acrylics.
4. Cloudy or milky color when cured.

Additional warning signs though less definitive:
1. Low price of fills and full sets (MMA cost 1/3 of EMA).
2. Dust or ventilation masks used (many technicians use dust masks today who do not use MMA). 3. Unlabeled containers - technician will not show or tell the client what brand of product is being used.
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Old July 5th, 2006, 09:58 AM   #37
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OH Ok. I gotcha now. Lifting should never be so prominent where you would notice it from just looking at her nails. If it is, then that's a really bad nail job! The acrylic was probably applied way too thick at the cuticle area and too close to the skin, which would cause lifting. Might have been a good idea to ask her where she got them done just so you'd know NOT to go there. :happy:




I will ask from now on, but I was not in a situation where I could ask.



Thank you for the information on nail service.
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Old July 5th, 2006, 01:43 PM   #38
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April, you really seem to know your stuff! Might I ask what's available in the San Fernando Valley area of California?
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Old July 5th, 2006, 02:14 PM   #39
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I've had acrylics a few times in the past and the only time I had good results is when I had them done completely by hand... no powertools. My nails are paper thin to begin with and I've had the grinders just about go completely through, I didn't notice at the time when she did it but as soon as she put down the new acrylic I almost hit the ceiling from the burning. Needless to say I never went back to that shop, that was so incredibly painful and it took forever to recover.

Years ago I used to have mine done completely by hand, it's more expensive and takes longer but for someone like me it's worth it. Right now it's not really a priority for me so I've just been keeping my natural nails somewhat short but polished.
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Old July 8th, 2006, 09:07 AM   #40
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Snowbear,
I havent found anyone specifically yet for you. Have you tried doing a google search? I would just recommend staying away from the mall shops, non-english speaking shops and the Walmarts nail salons. Dont be afraid to ask questions and get a tour of the place first. Make sure it's clean and ask them how they disinfect their implements.
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