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Old June 15th, 2006, 12:24 AM   #11
kimberlily
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Poor girl! I had a friend in elementary school who plucked out all her eyelashes. Kids, being cruel creatures, made her ashamed of her eyelash plucking habit, which made it worse. She went away for the summer for therapy and had stopped the plucking, but the teasing started up again because her lashes hadn't grown in completely, so she regressed. Her mom wound up hiring a tutor to homeschool her until her lashes grew in, then put her in a different school.
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Old June 15th, 2006, 06:39 AM   #12
Nini
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Hmm, all the strange things we end up doing... We actually had to keep my sister's head next to shaved when she was a kid. She didn't eat her hair, but she'd suck her thumb and pluck her hair out in patches. The doctors didn't really find a reason, but they said it could be due to nerves. She grew out of it though. And was fortunate enough to look good with her hair that short.

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Old June 15th, 2006, 10:14 AM   #13
idealthursday
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The official title is trichotillophasia. When I was working with Autistic kids I saw a girl who had both trichotillophasia and trichotillomania. It is a type of OCD and is treated with a variety of methods but is best treated by Cognitive Behavioral Therapy to work on breaking the soothing habit that the girl had formed.
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Old June 15th, 2006, 12:41 PM   #14
Barb
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In case anyone was wondering, Pica is a condition whose chief characteristic is eating non-food substances, like chalk, clay, dirt, etc. This is often the result of an underlying nutritional deficiency.

Occasionally, Pica can be caused by mental illness, but this seems the exception, rather than the rule.

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Old June 17th, 2006, 04:14 AM   #15
angelic
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Barb
Occasionally, Pica can be caused by mental illness, but this seems the exception, rather than the rule.

Hmmmm...I'm interested in where you found this information as from the the research I have done, and my psych texts, and the DSM -IV-TR all seem to indicate the exact opposite in regards to children and pica. If you click on the link that I originally provided about pica in my original post, you will see that there are as many as 25-30% of children that suffer from pica...and 20% of them are seen in mental health clinics...Pica is considered a mental disorder within itself if one uses the standard DSM criteria.

Moonchiald: Pica is classified by the DSM as being an early infancy/childhood eating disorder so if you have any texts that cover that subject you might find info about pica.
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Old June 17th, 2006, 06:47 AM   #16
idealthursday
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According to the Reber and Reber "Dictionary of Psychology" Pica is defined as "from the name of a genus of birds which includes the voracious magpie, a persistant eating of nonnutrititive substances, e.g. chalk, clay, bits of trash, etc. It offen accompanies mental retardation and in such cases us classified as a Feeding Disorder of Infancy or Early Childhood. Also called allotriophagy"
I am hunting for my Child Psychopathology book which has a more in debth definition including the decisions around the DSM-IV-TR definition.
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Old June 17th, 2006, 07:28 AM   #17
angelic
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Quote:
Originally Posted by idealthursday
According to the Reber and Reber "Dictionary of Psychology" Pica is defined as "from the name of a genus of birds which includes the voracious magpie, a persistant eating of nonnutrititive substances, e.g. chalk, clay, bits of trash, etc. It offen accompanies mental retardation and in such cases us classified as a Feeding Disorder of Infancy or Early Childhood. Also called allotriophagy"
I am hunting for my Child Psychopathology book which has a more in debth definition including the decisions around the DSM-IV-TR definition.

Keep in mind that there is some debate whether pica should be considered an eating disorder or whether it should be added to the spectrum of ocd. Pica is NOT indepth in regards to the DSM.

Yes, the name was derived from the magpie because the bird has a fancy for shiny things.

Oh, and by the way, did you mean trichollophagia? If your original source does not pursue pica further as being a genus of the magpie, you may want to pursue another instructor.
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Old June 17th, 2006, 07:36 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by idealthursday
I am hunting for my Child Psychopathology book which has a more in debth definition including the decisions around the DSM-IV-TR definition.


If you have any text books on abnormal child psych...check those out too....
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Old June 17th, 2006, 07:57 AM   #19
idealthursday
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I did mention trichotillophagia earlier as the correct definition for eating one's hair. I added my bit on Pica simply to add the correct psychological definition. I do know that there is a debate, however on the current revision of the DSM it is classified as an eating disorder. Pica is much more in debth in a child psychopathology book then in a general abnormal psych textbook, and I personally resent the comment you made about my instructor. Whether or not they went in debth about the genus of the magpie doesn't decide if they are good instructors.
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Old June 18th, 2006, 01:37 PM   #20
Barb
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Angelic,

I found the definition for Pica by going to Dictionary.com... not the fanciest place to look for a definition, but it seemed like a logical place to start.

If your DSM -IV-TR lists Pica as a disease, or condition, relating to mental health I certainly won't argue with it. I have heard of people who eat dirt and clay because they are lacking minerals in their diet, though.
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